ScheduleSpeakersCE CoursesPapersPostersLightning Talks
RegistrationScholarships
About StauntonHospitality
This is the "Papers" page of the "2017 Annual Meeting" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content

2017 Annual Meeting  

Last Updated: Sep 25, 2017 URL: http://macmla.libguides.com/MAC2017 Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

Papers Print Page
  Search: 
 
 

Face Your Fears

speaker

Photo Credit: sean dreilinger

 

List of Papers

Paper Session 1
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Salon A, B, & C

  • It’s OK to Say No: Librarian and Faculty Negotiations of Assignment Scalability in Online Education
    Christina L. Wissinger

  • Navigating a Pilot Project Through Uncharted Territory: How I Dealt with the Unexpected Pitfalls of Organizing Neuroimaging Data
    Lauren Tomola

  • Are You Afraid of the Future? The Tale of an MLS Students Exploration of Health Science Librarianship
    Ashley Cuffia

    (View abstracts)

Paper Session 2
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Shenandoah Ballroom

Track A

  • Faculty Fears and Technological Terrors
    Jamie Price and Christina LaFon

  • Learning from Failures in the File Cabinet
    Kristine M. Alpi

    (View abstracts)

Track B

  • Journal Impact Factor, CiteScore, and Eigenfactor: An Analysis of Journal Impact Metrics
    Andrea Goldstein Shipper

  • Mortal or Moodle? A Comparison of In-Person vs. Online Information Literacy Instruction
    Emily F. Gorman and Catherine Staley

    (View abstracts)

Paper Session 3
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Shenandoah Ballroom

 Track A

  • "Burnout, Professional"[MeSH]: A Study on the Subject of Medical Librarian Burnout
    Megan N. Kellner & Elizabeth O. Moreton

  • No opportunity? Fear not!: Information strategies to overcome institutional challenges
    Young-Joo Lee

    (View abstracts)

Track B

  • Master Health Literacy: A Participant-Focused Program in Development
    Michelle Pasier, Charlotte Selbo, Erin Dreelin, Kiri DeBose, Inga Haugen, Virginia Pannabecker

  • MedSpeak of the Devil: Facing Fears of Medical Terminology through Educational Strategies
    Rebecca Carlson McCall & Elizabeth O. Moreton

    (View abstracts)

Paper Session 1

Monday Oct. 23rd
11:00 AM -12:00 PM
Salon A, B, & C

11:00 AM-11:20 AM

It’s OK to Say No: Librarian and Faculty Negotiations of Assignment Scalability in Online Education
Christina L. Wissinger

Background: Librarians strive to become integrated into the curriculum of the departments they serve, but what happens when this integration is done without their knowledge or consultation? Does the librarian say no when a request is unreasonable? Do they risk alienating a faculty member or department? Do they take a firm stand or yield? This presentation will review how a librarian assignment integrated into an online undergraduate nursing course was managed and revised using library standards of service to accommodate the nursing faculty member’s goals and the librarian’s workload.

Methods: Once the librarian was made aware of the assignment, an in-person meeting was scheduled with the nursing faculty member responsible for the course. During the meeting, the library’s service model and librarian’s liaison areas were reviewed to allow the nursing faculty member to have a better understanding of the librarian’s workload and rationalize the request to change the assignment. Additionally, elements of systematic review searching were used to create concrete requirements for the assignment and facilitate scalability.

Results: The assignment was revised based on the librarian’s suggestions and new instructions were uploaded into the online course. Additionally, a library course guide was created and linked with the assignment instructions in the course management system. The guide provided additional examples for students and gave the librarian a page to easily revise that did not rely on the assistance of an instructional designer.

Conclusion: During the 2016-2017 academic year, approximately 200 online nursing students had virtual consultations with the subject librarian. Instructions for the assignment are revised each semester based on e-mail interactions with students and decisions related to the continued viability of the assignment are discussed. If the assignment is sustained the librarian will request access to student papers discussing the assignment and their interaction with the librarian to use as a form of assessment.

11:20 AM-11:40 AM

Navigating a Pilot Project Through Uncharted Territory: How I Dealt with the Unexpected Pitfalls of Organizing Neuroimaging Data
Lauren Tomola

Background: As academic research focuses more on making data public, new librarian roles can emerge by applying our traditional skills in innovative ways. This project set out to determine how a librarian could collaborate with researchers to organize and describe neuroimaging datasets.

Methods: I worked with a health informatics professor affiliated with an imaging institute on a pilot project to design a standardized organization schema and metadata vocabulary for neuroimaging data. This included both performing an environmental scan of existing neuroimaging data archives and creating a website using these new methods of organization. In the environmental scan, I planned to assess more than thirty archives for data availability, restrictions, and other details. I would then use the results to develop a metadata vocabulary that could be used to describe MRIs from the different archives. Funded by a UNC Libraries Innovation Grant, I hired a developer to create a website demonstrating the vocabulary using the ADNI collection of public de-identified images.

Results: While exploring this new role, I encountered a number of unexpected problems. I underestimated the scale of the original proposal to create an image-level vocabulary, discovering it wasn’t feasible with the resources available or the time commitments of my partners. I also learned that the amount of technical support was insufficient, since MRIs require considerable storage space and unique developer expertise. I had to confront the fact that I couldn’t complete the project as I had envisioned. I scaled down my objectives, creating a vocabulary for data archives instead of images. With this change, I ended up with a finished pilot that still demonstrates a successful collaboration.

Conclusion: Readjusting mid-project was difficult, but recognizing the problems and changing my plans helped me avoid failure. Unexpected problems can happen when trying new roles, but with adaptability, success is still possible.

11:40 AM-12:00 PM

Are You Afraid of the Future? The Tale of an MLS Students Exploration of Health Science Librarianship
Ashley Cuffia

Background: As an MLS student, I wanted to know how health science librarians became health science librarians, mainly due to the fact that my graduate program had no health science librarianship classes. I knew of this type of librarianship, only because I was currently working in a health science library. I wanted to find out, if other MLS programs did not have these types of classes then how did librarians end up in this distinct niche of librarianship.

Methods: This study consisted of 22 survey questions, focused on finding out if there was a common thread in the background of health science librarians. My focus was on active librarians who were currently working in the health sciences field. The survey was sent out on various listservs and to a variety of contacts who then passed it on to their contacts.  Using the program Qualtricts, I was able to create the survey, and also have the program analyze the information that was gathered. Unfortunately, since many of the questions were in paragraph format, I had to analyze all the responses by hand and categorize them, so they could be turned into numerical data.

Results: During the two weeks that the survey was open, I received 296 valid responses from 8 different countries. I was able to take that data, graphically represent it, and write an in-depth analysis paper needed to complete my MLS.

Conclusion: When the project was completed and the data fully analyzed, it became apparent that there were qualifying markers in the backgrounds of the participants of the survey that would lead to why they had become health science librarians.

(return to list of papers)

      
     

    Paper Session 2 Track A

    Monday Oct. 23rd
    3:00 PM -3:40 PM
    Shenandoah Ballroom

    3:00 PM-3:20 PM

    Faculty Fears and Technological Terrors
    Jamie Price and Christina LaFon

    Introduction: The library staff provides a plethora of services for Jefferson College of Health Sciences faculty and staff.  One service that was found to occupy significant time that took us away from other tasks and responsibilities were constant calls for assistance with technology in classrooms. Most of the problems that are brought to the library staff are issues from sound not working in classrooms, to projector issues, to even hardware failures.

    Methods: To combat this particular set of problems, the staff devised a plan with the Academic Technology Service Team to create a manual and training program that would allow us to train our student workers as minor technology service field agents. With this training and manual, students are equipped to go to classrooms and aid instructors that have minor technology problems.

    Results: Data was collected from the beginning of the fall semester 2016 (mid-August) until the end of spring semester 2017 (start of May).  An average of two visits was made each week to classrooms by student workers to address minor technology issues, with an average of six per month.  December 2016 and May 2017 saw no activity due to final exams.


    3:20 PM-3:40 PM

    Learning from Failures in the File Cabinet
    Kristine M. Alpi

    Background: Harvey and Wandersee (2010) reported that time restraints was a major reason librarian authors have a 27% publication rate of MLA-presented work.  We know less about other reasons librarians fail to present or share research or project findings. The purpose of this paper is to share accounts of failure to publish and discuss how to salvage learning from the process and share the methods and outcomes of the work.

    Methods: Six micro-case studies of early- and mid-career failures to publish were examined for insights into the relationship among factors such as individual and collaborative authorship, funding, expertise and confidence in methodology, and the nature of the findings.

    Results: Library school and fellowship research can be especially susceptible to being put in the file drawer during position transitions, especially if transitioning to an environment that does not require publications.  Failure to publish project-based work with collaborators varies with the nature of the collaboration, as having collaborators may encourage completion or may provide justification for non-completion.  Funding facilitates completing the research, but in and of itself may not lead to publication if that is not required by the funding source.  Methodological errors and null findings are especially difficult to overcome in terms of having confidence in the value of sharing the work so that others may learn from the mistakes or avoid repeating studies in the future.

    Conclusion: Examining failures to publish can lead to strategies to prevent future work stalling in the presentation or pre-presentation phase and ways to share what has been learned about methods and outcomes.  Most importantly, openly discussing unpublished work leads to the self-forgiveness that allows authors to continue to pursue new research and not be held back by guilt about previous projects languishing in the file drawer.

    (return to list of papers)

     

    Paper Session 2 Track B

    Monday Oct. 23rd
    3:00 PM -3:40 PM
    Shenandoah Ballroom

    3:00 PM-3:20 PM

    Journal Impact Factor, CiteScore, and Eigenfactor: An Analysis of Journal Impact Metrics
    Andrea Goldstein Shipper

    Background: For decades, Journal Impact Factor (JIF) has been the most widely accepted metric for measuring the importance of a journal in its field. Librarians have noted numerous limitations of the JIF and have urged caution in relying too heavily on any single metric in demonstrating the impact of research. In more recent years, a variety of other metrics have been created to look at the influence of scholarly journals from different angles, most recently Elsevier’s CiteScore, which was introduced in December 2016. This study aims to compare the scores and relative rankings of journals in the health sciences using three of these metrics: JIF, CiteScore, and Eigenfactor. In a time of increasing budget cuts, Journal Citation Reports, the only publisher of the JIF, may be out of reach for some libraries. Therefore, it is more important than ever to discover how freely available metrics like CiteScore and Eigenfactor compare to the more established JIF.

    Methods: 2016 CiteScore data will be downloaded from Elsevier’s website. 2016 JIF and Eigenfactor data will be downloaded from Journal Citation Reports. CiteScore and JIF values will be compared for journals in all health sciences and life sciences Web of Science categories. Journals’ rankings within these categories will be compared across CiteScore, JIF, and Eigenfactor. Trends and major differences between the metrics will be identified and analyzed.

    Results: To be completed before the MAC meeting.

    Conclusion: To be completed before the MAC meeting.

     

    3:20 PM-3:40 PM

    Mortal or Moodle? A Comparison of In-Person vs. Online Information Literacy Instruction
    Emily F. Gorman and Catherine Staley

    Background: A library’s distance learners are not always physically distant from the library. Many on-campus students interact with the library remotely to get research help or access resources; what about library instructional sessions? The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of online and in-person instructional methods for teaching research skills, as well as to determine student preferences for each method.

    Methods: The researchers (librarians) partnered with faculty instructors to transform a face-to-face research skills class into graded online modules for an upper-level undergraduate speech pathology course. In Spring 2017, one section of the course received the traditional in-person library session, while the second section completed the online modules. Online surveys were given to all students in the weeks following their library instruction. At the end of the semester, the researchers collected de-identified literature review assignment grades from the faculty instructors.

    Results: As of May 19, 2017, the researchers have received the de-identified literature review grades from the course instructors and a total of 28 survey responses from the participants. Of the 28 responses, 20 were from students in the online instruction section (83.33% response rate), and 8 were from the in-person section (57.14% response rate), with an overall response rate of 73.68%. Data analysis will be completed during Summer 2017.

    Conclusion: This study will illuminate the strengths of delivering instruction online and in-person so that the librarians can revise these and other online modules to align with students' learning styles and preferences. While many studies about online learning involve only distance students, this study assesses on-campus students’ perception of online learning. The results will allow librarians in all settings to provide better service to both traditional distance learners and on-campus learners who prefer an online-learning format for library-related content.

    (return to list of papers)

     

    Paper Session 3 Track A

    Monday Oct. 23rd
    4:00 PM -5:00 PM
    Shenandoah Ballroom

    4:00 PM-4:20 PM

    "Burnout, Professional"[MeSH]: A Study on the Subject of Medical Librarian Burnout 
    Megan N. Kellner, Associate Fellow, National Library of Medicine & Elizabeth O. Moreton, Nursing Liaison Librarian, UNC Chapel Hill

    Background: Studies have shown that librarians often have difficulty valuing themselves as researchers and team members, many times suffering from imposter syndrome or lacking self-confidence and authority.  As a result, librarians tend to adopt a do-everything and serve-everyone mindset that can lead to over-commitment, exacerbated stress and anxiety, and eventually burnout.  This study will explore sources of stress for librarians in their workplaces and identify interventions to prevent librarian burnout.

    Methods: Through a systematic review of the literature the researchers will identify the prevalence and common contributors to librarian burnout, as well as interventions to prevent or reduce feelings of burnout in the workplace. The researchers will develop toolkits for both new and experienced librarians with strategies for managing daily workloads and commitments and for coping with job-related stress.

    Results: The researchers will present key findings from the literature review. They will also distribute and discuss the toolkits with attendees.

    Conclusions: While some workplace stressors are unavoidable, librarians are able to change the way they react to those stressors. The toolkits developed in this study will educate librarians on better methods of self-care in the workplace in an effort to reduce job-related stress and burnout.

     

    4:20 PM-4:40 PM

    No opportunity? Fear not!: Information strategies to overcome institutional challenges
    Young-Joo Lee

    Background: Librarians play a large role in supporting faculty research. As a mid-career medical librarian, I was ready to support research when I took my current job as clinical librarian.  However, I learned that clinicians are either too busy or inexperienced in research. Lack of understanding or low expectation about the librarian’s skill was another major negative contributing factor that prevented me from being involved in research. I became concerned with losing my searching skills. The aim of this study is to show how I overcome my fear of losing research skills by utilizing various information strategies and to share my success stories.

    Methods: In order to support faculty research, I created opportunities for them by connecting them with scholarly communication opportunities. I targeted faculty who are too busy to present or publish. I selected a conference or publishing options they were not aware of and facilitated the process. Success cases of such strategy were submitting a protocol to Cochrane Database of Systematic Review and a presenting at a conference.

    A second strategy I employed was connecting early career faculty with grant information. Successful information strategies include: connecting faculty with grant of their research interest, finding collaborators on campus using faculty profile, and finding resources to write a stronger grant application.

    Finally, for the productive faculty with low expectation about a librarian’s research ability, I reached out to them with customized research metrics.

    Results: None to report

    Conclusion: None to report

    (return to list of papers)

     

    Paper Session 3 Track B

    Monday Oct. 23rd
    4:00 PM -5:00 PM
    Shenandoah Ballroom

    4:00 PM-4:20 PM

    Master Health Literacy: A Participant-Focused Program in Development
    Michelle Pasier, Charlotte Selbo, Erin Dreelin, Kiri DeBose, Inga Haugen, Virginia Pannabecker

    Background: Many of us face anxiety and uncertainty when it comes to health concerns. To help address this, three librarians at a research university are working with partners to develop a Master Health Literacy (MHL) volunteer program modeled after national extension programs such as “Master Gardener,” and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension’s Master Wellness Volunteer program. The MHL program will provide scaffolded health literacy content and guided self-directed learning to support individuals in growing their knowledge and skills, and to empower community members to access and apply information for personal and community well-being. Internal, grant-funded student positions were created to conduct a literature review and environmental scan for evidence-based program development.

    Methods: In year one we met with partners to guide program development: faculty in Population Health Sciences and Agricultural Extension. Three students were hired to conduct a review of the literature and an environmental scan of programs and educational materials, as well as to apply findings towards an initial program outline.

    Results: Literature review results will summarize: (1) need for health literacy programs, (2) successes of programs, (3) issues encountered by programs, and (4) potential solutions for preventing or addressing issues. Environmental scan results will highlight significant program websites and educational materials. A draft MHL pilot program outline will be shared.

    Conclusion: The literature review and environmental scan results, and conversations with stakeholders indicate a demonstrated need, and that this program has the capacity to serve various constituencies. Based on literature review findings, we have made modifications to our original ideas; in particular to scaffold the types of information, sources, and skills for initial program content to address various levels of participant experience. We will also add training to support final program projects. As next steps, we will work with partners to develop and implement a pilot program in 2018.

    4:20 PM-4:40 PM

    MedSpeak of the Devil: Facing Fears of Medical Terminology through Educational Strategies
    Rebecca Carlson McCall, Clinical Librarian, UNC Chapel Hill & Elizabeth Moreton, Nursing Liaison Librarian, UNC Chapel Hill

    Background: Medical librarians are confronted by complex medical terminology daily in their work with health sciences students, educators, and clinicians. The struggle to understand or to pronounce medical jargon can lead to fear of misunderstanding or appearing incompetent or unqualified. This fear, if not addressed, could result in anxiety and avoidance behaviors, preventing medical librarians from being successful in their work. We propose that this is a form of imposter syndrome and can be addressed through specific action strategies.

    Methods: To address a fear of medical jargon, based in a lack of understanding of the terminology, medical librarians need to improve their health literacy. Just as health consumers can improve their understanding of health information through education and resources specific to their needs, medical librarians will be better able to comprehend and apply complex medical terminology through education-focused solutions and resources. The paper presentation will describe the tools recommended by two medical librarians and provide an interactive exploration of the action strategies that we endorse.

    Results: Results will be available before the conference.

    Conclusion: If medical librarians face their fears of medical terminology and improve their ability to understand and to use it, they will not only be better able to build relationships with health sciences students and professionals and to excel in their medical research and educational roles, but they will also be better able to help health care consumers face similar fears.

    (return to list of papers)

    Description

    Loading  Loading...

    Tip