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2017 Annual Meeting  

Last Updated: Nov 10, 2017 URL: http://macmla.libguides.com/MAC2017 Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

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Poster Session 1

Monday the 23rd
9:45 AM-10:30 AM
Shenandoah Ballroom

From Fear to Fruition: Developing Student Research Day Videos
Gisela Butera, Brian McDonald, Alexandra Gomes

Create and Teach an Elective? Me? Overcoming fear of new roles
Alexandra Gomes, MSLS, MT, AHIP; Laura E. Abate, MSLS; Tom Harrod, MLS, MS

The Data Jigsaw Puzzle: Will Usage Data from Multiple Sources Document the Importance of Older Literature? (view poster)
Patricia Hinegardner, Meg Del Baglivo, Na Lin

The Power of Collaboration: Digitization of State Medical Society Journals (1900 - 2000). The University of Maryland, Baltimore’s Experience (view poster)
Patricia Hinegardner, Na Lin, Meg Del Baglivo, Maria Pinkas

Charting Unknown Territory: Digitizing Lab Notebooks (view poster)
Na Lin, Patricia Hinegardner

Don’t Go It Alone: Collaborating Across Institutions to Provide Bioinformatics Instruction (view poster)
Alexander Carroll, Barrie Hayes, Danica Lewis

A Healthy #Chat: Twitter Chat Participation to Engage Audiences, Share Health Resources, and Track Impact (view poster)
Joelle Mornini

Into the Deep Dark Woods: Facing the Unknown to Support Early Literacy and the Patient & Family Experience by Creating a New Storytime Program
Lydia Witman, Kimberley Barker, Janet Allaire

(View abstracts)

      

    Poster Session 2

    Monday the 23rd
    2:15 PM - 3:00pm
    Shenandoah Ballroom

    Q-Bank, anyone? Creating a question bank of medical informatics/information literacy test questions for librarians
    Lori Fitterling, Diane Garber, Erin Palazzolo

    Into the Trenches: Collaborating with Medical Students (view poster)
    Christine Andresen, Kathy Cable

    Enhancing “safety” and “case report” search filters applied in MEDLINE to support PubMed literature ‘Alerts’ for pharmacovigilance
    Candace Norton, MLS; Anna Ripple, MLS; Alfred Sorbello, DO, MPH; Olivier Bodenreider MD, PhD

    I know what you did last summer; created a new DOCLINE office of course (view poster)
    Erin Latta, Ashley Cuffia

    From screaming to screening: An evaluation of free systematic review software (view poster)
    Elizabeth Moreton,  Jamie Conklin, Leila Ledbetter, Rebecca Carlson McCall, Jennifer S. Walker

    Research Matrix Fear? EndNote to the Rescue! (view poster)
    Virginia Carden, AHIP, Beverly Murphy, AHIP, Jamie Conklin, Duke University Medical Center Library, Durham, NC, Connie Bishop, DNP, MBA, RN, BC-NI, North Carolina A & T, Greensboro, NC

    NAHRS Selected List of Physical Therapy Journals 2017
    Betsy Williams (Editor/Chair), Eileen Harrington, Diane Kearney, Lea Leininger, Michelle Rachal, Ansley Stuart, Jill Turner

    Promoting Discovery of Research Data:  Implementing a Data Catalog at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (view poster)
    Na Lin, Patricia Hinegardner

    (View abstracts)

        
       

      Poster Session 1 Abstracts

      Monday the 23rd
      9:45 AM-10:30 AM
      Shenandoah Ballroom

      From Fear to Fruition: Developing Student Research Day Videos
      Gisela Butera, Brian McDonald, Alexandra Gomes

      Objective: To conduct short video interviews of GW Research Day participants sharing their experiences and promoting their research.

      Background: During spring 2017, the George Washington University (GW) Himmelfarb Library proposed a video series capturing participants’ research experience during GW’s Annual Research Days. The primary goal of the video series was to promote GW research achievements on both a school and individual level. The short video interviews provided participants with a new method to share their work, discuss their experiences and highlight the research conducted at their school.

      Methods: The library collaborated with GW’s Office of the Vice President for Research (OVPR), School of Medicine, Milken Institute School of Public Health and School of Nursing to obtain permission to record students during Research Day. Using library-owned camera equipment, two librarians conducted short 2-3 minute interviews asking participants to briefly describe their study, share their personal experiences, and provide highlights of their research. Participants signed an authorization form permitting use and distribution of the video. The final edited videos were shared with the interviewees to obtain final approval from them and their advisors prior to public release.

      Results: Nineteen interviews were conducted and 15 participants provided final approval to use their video. Edits to address background noise and participants’ verbal errors were required. The students' videos were posted on the library's website and social media platforms, as well as shared with OVPR and the various schools for use by their marketing and communications departments. Future plans include expanding the video series to use it as a positive marketing tool to help promote GW Research Day.

      Conclusion: Traditionally, a poster is the only method to share participants’ work at scientific conferences and their school’s Research Day. The video series opened up opportunities to allow participants a professional platform to showcase their research.



      Create and Teach an Elective? Me? Overcoming fear of new roles
      Alexandra Gomes, MSLS, MT, AHIP; Laura E. Abate, MSLS; Tom Harrod, MLS, MS

      Objective:  To describe Himmelfarb librarians’ involvement in conceptualizing, creating and teaching 3-credit electives at The George Washington University, including obstacles overcome in the process. 

      Methods: Inquiries about new informatics instructional opportunities in the curriculum led to a suggestion that the librarians submit an elective proposal. Despite knowing nothing about the approval process or the responsibilities of being a course director, several librarians accepted the challenge as a learning experience. Developing the proposal included writing the proposal, formally presenting it to two curriculum committees for approval, and then creating the specific lesson plans, identifying associated readings, creating a grading rubric and syllabus, identifying and inviting relevant guest speakers, populating Blackboard with the course content, and teaching the specific elective sessions. 

      Results: So far the librarians have developed and taught one elective (Introduction to Systematic Reviews) to MS3 and MS4 students, and are in the process of developing a second elective. The approval process was intense and intimidating but ultimately successful. Development of the course content proved to be both time-consuming and labor-intensive, despite sharing the workload among three librarians. Although each librarian took responsibility for specific instructional sessions, having all librarian instructors attend all sessions allowed for real-time feedback and richer discussions. Student feedback for the course was positive and constructive, leading to additional changes to improve the course. 

      Conclusions: Librarians are ideally positioned to take on the creation of electives. In addition to topic expertise, librarians are organized and can meet deadlines, can tap a network of faculty relationships for guest lectures, and can easily handle the administrative and teaching responsibilities associated with being a course director and instructor. Collaborating with colleagues can increase ideas as well as share the workload, but if the various development and instructional tasks are broken down into smaller steps, they are less overwhelming and easily accomplished.

       

      The Data Jigsaw Puzzle: Will Usage Data from Multiple Sources Document the Importance of Older Literature?
      Patricia Hinegardner, Meg Del Baglivo, Na Lin

      Background:   Can journal usage data from a combination of three independent sources document the importance of older journal literature? This is one approach to validate the need to retain access to older literature within the Library’s collection.

      Method: This journal study used data from three sources: re- shelving statistics for print journals, document delivery, and turnaway data from online content. The data analyzed was from 2013 through 2016. This poster will describe the process used to prepare and align the data sources, the parameters for the analysis, the limitations of each source, the final outcome, and a conclusion regarding the value of this type of analysis.

      Results/Outcome:  After significant data aligning and discussion a list of journal titles was generated. This is the first step in an ongoing process to determine content retention for older literature, whether in print or digital format.

      Conclusion: This project was very labor intensive. If the three sources of usage statistics are to be used going forward, more granularity in the data is needed to consolidate totals and conduct trend analysis.

      view poster

       

      The Power of Collaboration: Digitization of State Medical Society Journals (1900 - 2000). The University of Maryland, Baltimore’s Experience
      Patricia Hinegardner, Na Lin, Meg Del Baglivo, Maria Pinkas

      Background: State medical society journals document the transformation of American medicine in the twentieth century at both local and national levels. Five academic health sciences libraries collaborated in contributing volumes from their collections for digitization. The Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) participated as a subcontractor on a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) awarded to the Medical Heritage Library (MHL). The MHL coordinated the project encompassing approximately 117 titles from 48 states spanning the years 1900 through 2000. 

      Methods: This poster will highlight the HS/HSL’s experience including the multi-step process of preparing the volumes, the coordination of responsibilities associated with the collaboration and lessons learned.

      Results/Outcome:  The HS/HSL processed 649 volumes the content of which is now accessible through the Medical Heritage Library collection within the Internet Archive. Access is also available through the UMB Digital Archive, providing an additional discovery point.

      Conclusion: All of the work was well worth the time and effort. The state medical society journals are now preserved and readily available online. This project and the commitment of the collaborators is an excellent example of what can happen when libraries work together. 

      view poster


      Charting Unknown Territory: Digitizing Lab Notebooks
      Na Lin, Patricia Hinegardner

      Background: An opportunity to offer a new service using the skill sets of the interlibrary loan staff was presented to the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HSHSL) when the Chief of the Division of Obstetric Anesthesiology, University of Maryland Medical Center approached the HSHSL with a request to photocopy 40 lab notebooks comprising over 30 years of patient treatment data.  After careful consideration the Library extended an offer to digitize the notebooks for a fee. The offer was accepted.

      Methods: The HIPAA protected patient data presented a significant challenge requiring a HIPAA Business Associate Agreement (BAA) between the university and the owners of the data, The Faculty Physicians, Inc. (FPI). It also required several safeguards be incorporated into the digitization process to be in compliance with HIPAA guidelines. This poster will describe the development of the project and the lessons learned.

      Results/OutcomeThe 40 lab notebooks were digitized and stored on encrypted flash drives which will enable computer-aided data analysis. 

      Conclusion: The project’s success led to the decision to continue the service.

      view poster

       

      Don’t Go It Alone: Collaborating Across Institutions to Provide Bioinformatics Instruction
      Alexander Carroll, Barrie Hayes, Danica Lewis

      Background: While demand remains high for training on literature searching to support grant applications and evidence-based practice, user communities increasingly are asking health sciences librarians to provide instructional support for non-text information resources, such as biological sequence and molecular data. Given that their instructional capacity is already stretched thin, many librarians are apprehensive about developing new classes that support these emerging topics.

      Methods: Librarians at the North Carolina State University Libraries and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Health Sciences Library set out to collaboratively develop a shared suite of instructional materials to facilitate offering hands-on bioinformatics workshops at both institutions. Using collaboration tools such as Skype and Box, instructional design responsibilities were split among librarians at both institutions. All instructional materials, including lecture slides, handouts, in-class exercises, and assessment instruments, were designed with the goal of being essentially identical, which reduced redundancies and enabled results to be compared across institutions. 

      Results: A debut workshop was held at both institutions in March 2017. Between both institutions, 28 attendees participated in the workshop. Attendee responses to the workshop in the post-session assessment were overwhelmingly positive; the most common suggestions were for longer training sessions with more hands-on activities and additional workshops on biological sequence searching. Due to demand, additional workshops have been scheduled for November 2017.

      Conclusions: Developing instructional content in concert, rather than re-purposing another institution’s materials after the fact, generates learning objects that authentically meet the needs of a broader range of users in terms of disciplines and affiliate statuses. These approaches enable librarians to expand their instructional capacity into areas that may have been too time-consuming otherwise, and to extend instructional reach and impact further than librarians at either institution could achieve on their own. Collaboratively developing instructional materials across institutions also builds a community of practice, which can offer support and mitigate the anxieties that can accompany teaching workshops in new areas of expertise.

      view poster


      A Healthy #Chat: Twitter Chat Participation to Engage Audiences, Share Health Resources, and Track Impact
      Joelle Mornini

      Objectives:Twitter chats are a popular social media method for promoting awareness and sharing resources on consumer health topics. This project provides best practices on: how to locate relevant Twitter chats to attend, how to actively participate by sharing quality health resources and engaging participants to discuss and explore your resources, and how to measure the efficacy of the Twitter chats.  
       
      Methods:Over a period of eight months in 2016, Twitter chats were attended three or more times per month to share quality consumer health resources with family caregivers. Relevant Twitter chats were located through the Tweet Chats schedule on the website Symplur and through the Twitter feeds of government and non-profit organizations. Participation in the Twitter chats was conducted through HootSuite, a free tool with subscription features. Hootsuite allows the user to view multiple Twitter streams on one screen, which increases response speed and engagement opportunities. The percentage of tweets retweeted (shared by other users) and percentage of tweets favorited (liked by other users) was tracked on a monthly basis using the free online analytics tool Twitonomy (which includes subscription features), to see if attendance of Twitter chats led to higher levels of engagement with users and sharing of library resources.  
       
      Results: 34 Twitter chats were attended between May 1 and December 31, 2016, with between three and five chats attended monthly.  Frequently attended chats focused on dementia caregiving and provided the opportunity to interact with family caregivers and organizations that work with caregivers and care recipients.  Percentage of tweets retweeted ranged from 29% to 49% over the eight month period, and percentage of tweets favorited ranged from 28% to 37%. No positive correlation was found between number of Twitter chats attended and percentage of tweets retweeted or favorited. 
       
      Conclusion: Twitter chats provide a unique opportunity to engage with both healthcare professionals and the general public in order to share reliable health resources. Tools like Symplur, HootSuite, and Twitonomy can be used to more effectively identify, participate in, and measure impact of relevant chats.  Although no positive correlation was found between number of chats attended and overall engagement, there was still a reasonably high level of Twitter engagement throughout the eight month period of this study. Further research with a larger sample of Twitter accounts is needed to identify if Twitter chat attendance consistently leads to higher levels of engagement.

      view poster

       

      Into the Deep Dark Woods: Facing the Unknown to Support Early Literacy and the Patient & Family Experience by Creating a New Storytime Program
      Lydia Witman, Kimberley Barker, Janet Allaire

      Background: Responding to a request from a UVA Health System pediatric services administrator, the Patient & Family Library (PFL) created a monthly children's storytime program. The program provides library outreach to pediatric patients and families as well as to children and family of adult patients; promoting early literacy aligns with an existing early literacy program. An established donor was approached about giving away free children's books during storytime. Health literacy research suggests that prose literacy, which is being able to read written words, is associated with health literacy and therefore health status.

      Methods: After receiving the request from the medical center, the PFL manager approached a Health Sciences Library librarian about reading to children during a monthly storytime program. The librarian agreed and also offered to create a character. The PFL manager collaborated with the Children's Hospital, especially nursing, to establish basic program goals and format. The Director of Ambulatory Services for Children's Hospital and Women's Services reached out to their established donor from the SoHo Center, which was already providing free children's books to hospitalized and ambulatory pediatric patients. The donors approved of adding monthly storytime to the existing free books for children.

      Results: To date (Aug 24, 2017), 16 storytimes have been completed and approximately 120 books have been distributed, average approx 8 per storytime hour. Briar Copperleaf, the Book Faery, has been very well received by patients, their families, visitors, and staff. The program has evolved so that it’s now “on the road” and doesn’t take place in the PFL but in Children’s Hospital inpatient areas, outpatient pediatric and adult clinic waiting rooms, and public areas of the medical center such as lobbies. In recent months, requests from Children’s Hospital staff for additional storytime hours have exceeded the capacity of library staff time.

      Conclusions: Facing our fear, we stepped outside of established medical librarian roles to create a meaningful and enjoyable new program. Collaboration with medical center departments strengthens partnerships, allows the library to provide greater outreach, and adds a new method of support and education for patients and their families. (It’s also really fun!)

      (return to list)

      Poster Session 2 Abstracts

      Monday the 23rd
      2:15 PM - 3:00pm
      Shenandoah Ballroom

      Q-Bank, anyone? Creating a question bank of medical informatics/information literacy test questions for librarians
      Lori Fitterling, Diane Garber, Erin Palazzolo

      Abstract: With the inclusion of medical informatics and information literacy skills in required core competencies, medical librarians are teaching courses in these topics that require a formal assessment. Librarians from three osteopathic schools surveyed osteopathic medical libraries to find out how many librarians are teaching formalized courses in the curriculum, how many librarians are writing formal test questions on medical informatics and/or information literacy topics, and whether there is any interest in creating a shared bank of medical library test questions.  A majority (57%) of respondents indicated that they would participate and use a database of library instruction test questions.

      Objectives: As medical librarians assume more formalized roles within the curriculum and with an increase in librarians writing test questions for assessment of instruction classes, this project highlights the need for a bank of test questions on medical informatics and information literacy as taught by librarians.

      Methods: This project began as librarians started sharing test questions for courses taught on medical informatics and information literacy. With the inclusion of medical informatics and information literacy skills in required core competencies, medical librarians are teaching courses in these topics that require a formal assessment. Librarians from three osteopathic schools surveyed osteopathic medical libraries to find out how many librarians are teaching formalized courses in the curriculum, how many librarians are writing formal test questions on medical informatics and/or information literacy topics, and whether there is any interest in creating a shared bank of medical library test questions. Information about how librarians write learning objectives for lectures and relate these to exam questions was also obtained.

      Results: 100% of responders indicated that their library provides information literacy sessions or classes at their schools, with 57% giving exams or tests in their courses. Of the librarians writing test questions, 62.5% indicated collaboration with other librarians, bio-scientists, and clinicians for at least some of their questions, while the other 37.5% indicated that they only write questions independently. Additionally, 87.5% of the librarians that wrote test questions indicated that at least some of their questions have an osteopathic and/or clinical element. Finally, 57% of all respondents indicated that they would use a database of library instruction test questions.

      Conclusion: This project validates an interest in developing a shared database of test questions for medical informatics/information literacy as taught by academic osteopathic librarians. All of the libraries that answered the survey offer some form of instruction and the majority of librarians in our study are currently writing test questions. This data highlights the interest I working collaboratively as librarians to share exam questions for instruction classes. Additionally, the survey revealed that 43% of the respondents reported that they were “not welcome” or “not very welcome” within the formal curriculum with little to no time allotted for information literacy instruction. Further inquiry into the medical informatics/information literacy experiences of librarians would benefit the library instruction community.



      Into the Trenches: Collaborating with Medical Students
      Christine Andresen, Kathy Cable

      Objective: After the successful implementation of a study room project to increase medical students’ use of the library’s physical spaces, the liaison librarian for the School of Medicine was challenged to increase medical students’ use of the library’s anatomical models collection. Working closely with the Instructional Design Librarian and second year medical students, a partnership was formed to provide students with a unique opportunity to actively engage in collection development.

      Methods: First, the liaison librarian to the School of Medicine, Instructional Design Librarian, and second year medical students worked to identify items in the library’s anatomical models collection that would be useful for first year medical students. During this process, we identified gaps in the library’s current anatomical model collection and with end-of-year funding during 2015-2016 fiscal year, additional models were purchased to ensure availability of library resources to support the anatomy curriculum. Finally, the librarians got to work developing orientation guides for each of the identified models to provide a customized study experience for first year medical students.

      Results: By identifying relevant anatomical models targeted at specific pieces of the anatomy curriculum, the library’s anatomical model usage has more than doubled during the 2016-2017 fiscal year.

      Conclusions: Integrating the medical students into the library’s collection development procedures resulted in an increase in the use of library’s anatomical model collection. Relationships were forged that will help the library identify medical students’ future needs. The success of this pilot project spread and the librarians are now involved in similar projects to integrate the library's anatomical models into the anatomy curriculum for Physician Assistant Studies, Nursing, and the Anatomy & Physiology undergraduate courses.

      View poster

      Enhancing “safety” and “case report” search filters applied in MEDLINE to support PubMed literature ‘Alerts’ for pharmacovigilance
      Candace Norton, MLS; Anna Ripple, MLS; Alfred Sorbello, DO, MPH; Olivier Bodenreider MD, PhD

      BACKGROUND: In this study, we seek to augment  currently implemented text word-based ‘safety’ and ‘case report’ search filters used in designing MEDLINE search queries for FDA regulatory staff. PubMed literature Alerts’ is a mediated search service that leverages existing functionalities in MyNCBI to provide weekly retrieval emails of the most recently published biomedical citations relevant to drugs and adverse effects to over 100 FDA regulatory reviewers.  

      METHODS: We conducted the following three analyses to identify new candidate text words: (1) compared existing FDA ‘safety filterto published adverse effects (AE) search filters, (2) subjected FDA ‘case report’ search filter to successive fractioning/cycling of PubMed citations indexed with ‘case reports’ [publication type] through Boolean ‘NOT’ing high-frequency candidate text words, and (3) analyzed 68 pharmacovigilance-relevant MEDLINE citations for relevant text words for the current ‘case report’ filter

      RESULTS: Comparison of the FDA 'safety filter' to published AE search filters revealed two candidate text word phrases: "treatment emergent" and "undesirable effect*”. Examination of ‘case report’ [publication type] citations and the 68 pharmacovigilance-relevant citations revealed subsets of candidate text words relevant to (1) subjects/patient population and (2) descriptive terms aligned with a ‘case report’ presentation and phrases connoting the rare nature of adverse drug events, such as  “previously healthy”, “newly diagnosed” and “no history”.

      CONCLUSIONS:  We identified several candidate text words and phrases to potentially augment currently employed FDA ‘safety’ and ‘case report’ search filters. Future work will involve validation in a retrieval experiment with relevance feedback.   

      Acknowledgements: This project was supported in part by appointment to the NLM Associate Fellowship Program sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and administered by Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) for the NIH.  Funding support also received from FDA/CDER/Office of Translational Sciences and the Intramural Research Program, NIH, National Library of Medicine. Disclaimer: The views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the US FDA, the NIH, or the US Government.


      I know what you did last summer; created a new DOCLINE office of course
      Erin Latta, Ashley Cuffia

      Background: The establishment and inauguration of a National Coordinating Office may sound like a daunting task, but one Library and its intrepid staff faced their fears and endeavored to not only create a national coordinating office but to ensure its longevity, as well as provide continuity of service, while centralizing what had previously been the a network of several discrete and disparate regional offices 

      Methods: Armed with their trusty statistical data and metric evaluation the Library took aim at its somewhat spooky goals and indicators. Led by a seasoned library professional who took up the charge of ushering in this transition, specific aims were established, with detailed approaches proposed to serve those aims. Measure, purpose, type of information, and timeframe of collection were all data points for consideration in areas as varied as outreach, training, professional development, and technical improvements. The transition took on another form when the inaugural coordinator moved out of the position and hired a new coordinator. 

      Results: As the Office finishes its first full year as a national office their statistics, feedback, and questionnaire results have indicated that by all metrics and measure the office is functioning successfully and seamlessly, and sees its efficacy and reach extending well beyond its initial magnitude.

      Conclusions: Providing day-to-day service to its users is the top priority for this newly-formed national office. Providing access to biomedical and health information is fundamental to the mission and goals of the office and without it fully supported and operational this efficient dissemination and exchange of information cannot take place. The support and opportunities this office offers serves affiliated and unaffiliated health professionals, researchers, librarians, and the public. Our fears abated as information and communication once again brought our deepest fears out into the light where they can be faced and conquered. 

      view poster



      From screaming to screening: An evaluation of free systematic review software
      Elizabeth Moreton,  Jamie Conklin, Leila Ledbetter, Rebecca Carlson McCall, Jennifer S. Walker

      Background: Systematic reviews are a popular publication type for researchers and are increasingly used as experiential learning tools in curricula.  Systematic review software helps to expedite reviews by organizing and streamlining parts of the review process and reducing data entry.  Despite the many benefits of this software, libraries may not be able to support the purchase of systematic review tools that can cost anywhere from the price of a journal to the price of an entire database.  This study analyzes the usability of free systematic review software for use by individual reviewers or review teams and in classroom settings.

      Methods: Using the Systematic Review Toolbox to identify systematic review software, librarians tested several types of systematic review software by performing sample reviews.  They performed a structured analysis of the software, looking at dimensions such as learning curve, data import/export, range of functions available, ease of screening, sorting capabilities, managing full text, collaboration, and scalability.

      Results: Results will be presented as a poster at MAC 2017.

      Conclusion: Though there are many types of free systematic review software available, several have design flaws that would preclude them from certain types of use or user. This poster will compare the systematic review tools and features available in each type of software for various types of users.

      View poster



      Research Matrix Fear? EndNote to the Rescue!
      Virginia Carden, AHIP, Beverly Murphy, AHIP, Jamie Conklin, Duke University Medical Center Library, Durham, NC, Connie Bishop, DNP, MBA, RN, BC-NI, North Carolina A & T, Greensboro, NC

      Background: School of Nursing PhD and Doctor of Nursing Practice students accumulate articles for their Capstone/Theses projects over several years and experience anxiety over the best methods to keep everything organized. This poster shows how EndNote was used to facilitate creating a research matrix to efficiently manage and evaluate journal articles, while simultaneously relieving student angst.

      Methods: A need for a way to reduce duplication of data recording was identified by a student during a library EndNote session. The student and librarian then collaborated to explore the using of EndNote as a means of gathering and reporting article data (e.g. purpose, setting sample, research design, variables, results, etc and evidence).  Taking advantage of numerous and generally unused fields in an EndNote reference, the journal article reference type was modified to create the matrix fields.  The APA 6th Output Style was augmented to include the various matrix fields using a common delimiter.

      Results: The completed references were then exported into EXCEL and formatted as needed. A handout was developed with detailed instructions and used in succeeding classes.

      View poster



      NAHRS Selected List of Physical Therapy Journals 2017
      Betsy Williams (Editor/Chair), Eileen Harrington, Diane Kearney, Lea Leininger, Michelle Rachal, Ansley Stuart, Jill Turner

      Background: The 2017 NAHRS Selected List of Physical Therapy Journals [Selected PT Titles] will help librarians with collection development and could assist faculty in identifying publishing options. Physical Therapy research is often published in interdisciplinary journals, and these are included in the list. The list compares database coverage and full text options for each title, including open access.

      Methods: The team consists of one chair and six NAHRS members. The 2012 NAHRS Selected List of Nursing Journals was the foundation for the Selected PT Titles. Initial list of titles was compiled from Ulrichsweb, CINAHL, NLM catalog, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), and studies mapping the core journals of physical therapy. The team developed the following inclusion criteria: 

      • Peer reviewed 
      • Published in English or bilingual English/other 
      • Currently published with a print or electronic ISSN 
      • Indexed in a database

      After resolving title changes and removing ceased titles, we verified journal information, database coverage, and full text access. We will assess the usefulness of the list, possibly via page views, citations, or a survey. Evidence-based practice [EBP] content may be included in the future.

      Results: The final list of 225 titles includes 83% interdisciplinary journals identified as highly cited in mapping studies. We chose to defer collecting EBP content data in order to hasten dissemination of the list on the NAHRS website.

      Conclusions: The Selected PT Titles was based on the methodology and format of the NAHRS Selected List of Nursing Journals, modified to reflect coverage relevant to physical therapy. Using the nursing list as a model saved a considerable amount of time. We also had four studies mapping the physical therapy literature for reference. As with the nursing journal list, the Selected PT Titles combines important information in one place, and will be useful in collection development and faculty publishing decisions.



      Promoting Discovery of Research Data:  Implementing a Data Catalog at the University of Maryland, Baltimore
      Na Lin, Patricia Hinegardner

      Background: The sharing of research datasets is an important aspect of data management and has the potential to advance health care.  The Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) is implementing a data catalog to facilitate the discovery of datasets created by UMB researchers. The project will provide an opportunity to increase awareness on campus of the importance of data management, data sharing, and provide researchers with a venue for showcasing their work. The data catalog will be accessible to researchers on campus and beyond providing an opportunity for interdisciplinary collaboration by facilitating the identification of common research interests. The HS/HSL received an award from the Regional Medical Library Southeastern/Atlantic Region to support the initial implementation. 

      Method: UMB is implementing the New York University (NYU) Health Sciences Library’s data catalog software. The code is freely available through GitHub. The staff of NYU have been generous in sharing their experiences and the documentation used during the development of their data catalog. As a proof of concept project HS/HSL staff will document the challenges associated with implementing the software and populating the catalog with an initial set of records. Outreach efforts will concentrate on researchers in UMB’s schools of medicine, nursing and social work. Policy and procedural documents developed over the course of the project can serve as a reference for other adopting institutions. This poster will outline the HSHSL’s experiences and lessons learned.  

      Results/Outcomes: Midway through the process, documentation for metadata entry has been developed. Researchers from the schools of social work and pharmacy are participating and providing valuable feedback. Research deans have expressed concerns about the actual process of sharing data, most notably the issue of de-identification under HIPAA requirements. Campus policy and those of other institutions are currently being investigated. 

      Conclusion: The data catalog team continues to reach out to the campus community for participation and feedback. A soft roll-out is anticipated sometime in the fall.

      view poster

      (return to list)

          
         

        Connect with Colleagues!

        MAC2008 poster session

         

        Poster Sessions

        Monday Oct. 23
        Shenandoah Ballroom

        Poster Session 1
        9:45 AM-10:30 AM
        Poster List
        Abstract List

        Poster Session 2
        2:15 PM - 3:00pm
        Poster List
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